CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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Capital, coercion, and crime: Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Details and ordering information at Stanford University Press.

These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries. Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Portrayals of a weak state captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

Contents Bossism and State Formation. In the case of the Philippines, it is clear that certain cultural factors configure social and political relations between bosses and their supporters, as well as within a given network of bosses.

Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. By Oona Thommes Paredes The Philippines, as a Third-World, post-colonial nation, has its share of fairly serious political, economic, and social problems.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines – John Thayer Sidel – Google Books

These conclusions should demand capitl attention from the many scholars and policy specialists concerned with the recent wave of democratization across the globe. With clear photographs of bullet-ridden, blood-spattered walls p.

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This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture — an issue I address further below. McCoy, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

This is because bossism both relies upon and reinforces the deplorable status quo in terms of widespread poverty, inequality, landlessness, lawlessness, and other socio-economic ills. The contrast between single-generation gangster politicians in Cavite and enduring commercial dynasties in Cebu reveals variation in the forms of bossism that reflect variations in the local political economies of the two provinces.

Knowing this, it becomes entirely conceivable that some bosses remain in power simply because they are legitimately re-elected.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime. Describe the connection issue. Sidel, John Capital, coercion, and crime: This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic thr over an area’s coercive and economic resources.

It is painfully obvious that bossism is highly damaging to Philippine society as a whole, at the very least because it corrupts electoral politics and hobbles the development of a truly representative democracy. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

But, seen from a comparative perspective, it is clear that electoral democracy and bossism go hand-in-hand. Contemporary Issues iin Asia and the Pacific. These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries.

No doubt we are shown only the tip of the iceberg, as a detailed pathology of any one of these provincial and small-town bosses would fill volumes.

Social Science Research on Sout heast A sia 5: SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries. Local bossism flourished in Burma during the early postindependence period of parliamentary rule, but faded at least in Burma proper with the imposition of centralized military rule in Poverty and insecurity leave many voters vulnerable to clientelist, coercive, and financial pressure, and the state’s central role in capital accumulation provides the basis for local bosses’ economic empires and political machines.

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Stanford University Press, Ruud, and Clarinda Still. It builds on, while going significantly beyond, what other scholars have done and lays out a reasoned argument that future scholarship will have to engage about how public offices are won and lost and for whose benefit.

The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

Selected pages Title Page.

SearchWorks Catalog

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Although an electoral democracy allows bossism to fester, it can also be its downfall. Other editions – View all Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations.

Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse oblige is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence.

The district-level dynasties of Cebu– 6. Click here to sign up. Skip to search Skip to main content. My library Help Advanced Book Search. Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development. Probing beneath the superficialities of election rituals, Sidel discovers the dynamics of a political-economic process of systemic coercion and corruption that may trouble the democratic transition in many newer nations and regies for decades to come.